Video "A discussion about American sculptor Alexander Calder"


This is a great video showing Alexander Calder's Grandson Alexander Rower, He is director and curator of the Alexander and Louisa Calder Foundation and co-editor of the beautiful book 'Calder: Gravity and Grace'. http://www.amazon.com/Calder-Gravity-Grace-Carmen-Gimenez/dp/0714846341/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1261956511&sr=1-2
A must have book for the Calder enthusiast. Also: http://www.amazon.com/Calder-Sculpture-Alexander-S-C-Rower/dp/0789301342/ref=pd_sim_b_9

Art Meets Science: Calderoids

Dodge and destroy Alexander Calder’s mobile constellations in
the cosmic spacecraft of Ed Logg’s Atari Asteroids!
PLAY | SCIENCE | ART

Blast Calder’s mobiles to a million brightly coloured bits! Instead of being a mere spectator to the play, irony, and humour of the toys in Calder’s Circus, or a spectator to the free play of the motion of Calder’s mobiles, in Calderoids you get to play with his art yourself when you climb in your spaceship and fly around his sculptures, laughing as you zap them to pieces!
Calderoids illustration

Few artists approached the world with as much of a sense of play as the inventor of mobiles: "Alexander Calder chose, aesthetically and morally, to play, to play for keeps at playing the game, because art at the time was a game or it was nothing. That’s how Calder understood it, and that’s how the best minds in that Paris which was a ‘moveable feast’ understood it as well" (Francisco Calvo Serraller, Gravity & Grace, 2004). Calder’s workshop would have found a home in the playland of the early Atari development lab: "Work is a word used very loosely at Atari. Most of the Atari employees I saw projected an aura of almost delirious bliss. They didn't seem to think of themselves as working. This isn't a company, I said to myself, it's a candy factory" (David Owen, Esquire, 1981).

Calder’s first major artwork was the animated Circus, a series of wire automata whose motion delighted and amused avant-garde Paris. Crashes between his abstract Circus forms foresee the cosmic conflagrations of Calderoids: "It was possible to move colored discs across the rectangle, or fluttering pennants, or cones; to make them dance, or even have battles between them. Some of them had large simple majestic movements, others were small and agitated" (Calder, Mobiles, 1937).

With mobiles, Calder plays with the fourth dimension of time: "Just as one can compose colors or forms, so one can compose motions" (Calder, Modern Painting and Sculpture, 1933). In Calderoids the gravity and grace of his mobiles arc through space with the zero-g elegance of Ed Logg’s spaceship: "Asteroids fulfilled the fantasy of being out in space, with no gravity, and free floating. The spaceship had a very elegant grace. A lot of motion in the game had grace, even the way the boulders floated around" (Rich Adam, original Atari programmer, The Atari Library).

Wikipedia: Mobile (sculpture)

A mobile is a type of kinetic sculpture constructed to take advantage of the principle of equilibrium. It consists of a number of rods, from which weighted objects or further rods hang. The objects hanging from the rods balance each other, so that the rods remain more or less horizontal. Each rod hangs from only one string, which gives it freedom to rotate about the string.

The sculptor Alexander Calder is well known for his mobiles. Calder invented the mobile in 1931. Marcel Duchamp suggested the name "mobile".[1] Mobiles are also popular in the nursery, where they hang over cribs to give infants something to entertain them and give them external visual stimulation.

The meaning of the term “mobile” as applied to sculpture has evolved since it was first suggested by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe the early, mechanized creations of Alexander Calder. At this point, “mobile” was synonymous with the term “kinetic art”, describing sculptural works in which motion is a defining property. While motor or crank-driven moving sculptures may have initially prompted it, the word “mobile” later came to refer more specifically to Calder’s free-moving creations. Influenced by the abstract work of Piet Mondrian, Joan Miró and Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Calder in many respects invented an art form where objects (typically brightly coloured, abstract shapes fashioned from sheet metal) are connected by wire much like a balance scale. By the sequential attachment of additional objects, the final creation consists of many balanced parts joined by lengths of wire whose individual elements are capable of moving independently or as a whole when prompted by air movement or direct contact. Thus, “mobile” has become a more well-defined term referring to the many such hanging constructs Calder produced in a prolific manner between the 1930s and his death in 1976. A succinct definition of the term “mobile” in a visual art sense could be a type of kinetic sculpture in which an ensemble of balanced parts capable of motion are hung freely in space.

What is an art mobile?

Mobiles by Julie Frith
Frithmobiles: Mobiles by Julie Frith


Mobile (art), in art, type of sculpture characterized by the ability to move when propelled by air currents, by touch, or by a small motor at any one time. The most striking feature of the mobile is that, unlike traditional sculpture, it achieves its artistic effect through movement; it is the most familiar form of kinetic art, which requires movement of some kind. A typical mobile consists of a group of shapes, frequently abstract, that are connected by wires, string, metal rods, or the like. Although mobiles are usually suspended, some are designed to stand on a platform or floor. The first experimental mobiles were the work of the French artist Marcel Duchamp in the 1920s.The form, however, was developed to its finest expression so far by the American sculptor Alexander Calder, beginning in the 1930s. written by Marco Mahler

Words: Mobile and Stabile

Mobile : moábile 'mO-"bEl

Word Definitions: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

Mobile
moábile Pronunciation: 'mO-"bEl

Function: noun : a construction or sculpture frequently of wire and sheet metal shapes with parts that can be set in motion by air currents; also: a similar structure (as of paper or plastic) suspended so that it moves in a current of air.

Stabile staábile Pronunciation: 'sta -"bEl

Function: noun Etymology: probably from French, from Latin stabilis, adjective : an abstract sculpture or construction similar in appearance to a mobile but made to be stationary

Where did the word "mobile" art come from?


Russian Constructivist Alexander Rodchenko appropriated the idea of the hanging mobile. From this idea, Alexander Calder (1898-1976) was the first to develop the mobile as a three-dimensional kinetic art form. In 1932 Marcel Duchamp gave the name "mobiles" to Alexander Calder 's new art forms. Calder also made static, sculptural constructions called "stabiles", this term was titled by Jean Arp.